Our Approach

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"While the notion of therapy can be discouraging and bewildering, ongoing dialogue to fine tune therapy plans is important in replacing anxiety and confusion with hope and clarity."

An Integrative Approach 

Caregivers are encouraged to be part of the assessment process as their unique relationship with the child may lend different concerns and perspectives of the child's needs. The conversation with each family begins in the first session and develops over subsequent sessions. The information gathered goes towards developing treatment goals and therapy that family members can carry out.

 

While the notion of therapy can be discouraging and bewildering, ongoing dialogue to fine tune therapy plans is important in replacing anxiety and confusion with hope and clarity.

Each individual is assessed holistically using an integrative approach where aspects crucial to effective learning are discussed during treatment planning. Recommendations to appropriate professionals will also be discussed.

 

A good foundation in each of the following systems allows us to thrive and learn throughout our lives. With the latest evidence-based practices in speech and language therapy, we hope to help our clients understand all these aspects and be the best that they can be.

Model of Language Therapy

Therapy evolves as scientists study how the brain learns. A large part of our work involves keeping caregivers and individuals who work with us up-to-date about the latest research in language learning.

 

Therapy can take the form of play, games, discussion, stories, role play and more, so that children experience language. For therapy to be effective, language needs to be practised across five domains and four modalities at word, sentence and paragraph levels. (Gleason, '05)                                                                                                                                           

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Gleason, J.B (2005). The Development of Language ( 6th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc.

The five domains of language are:

  • Phonology : Ability to identify and distinguish phonemes (e.g. “b” vs “d”) while listening (i.e. phonological awareness).

 

  • Semantics : An understanding of word meanings (i.e. vocabulary) and combinations of words.

 

  • Morphology : Use of grammatical rules to govern how the smallest meaningful units of language (e.g. -ful, -ing, -s) are used.

 

  • Syntax : An understanding of sentence structures (i.e. person+ action+ object) and how words can be combined to form sentences (e.g. The girl is eating a banana).

 

  • Pragmatics : Understanding the rules associated with the use of language in conversation and broader social situations.